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Tuesday, October 15
 

8:30am BST

Registration
Tuesday October 15, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am BST
Palmerston

9:00am BST

FSCI Planning
Tuesday October 15, 2019 9:00am - 9:15am BST
Bedford

9:00am BST

Citations needed: Wikidata and the scholarly publishing ecosystem
Participation in this workshop is free to registered participants of the FORCE2019 meeting, but required. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4. Register for the #FORCE2019 meeting here.
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Since Wikidata’s launch in 2012 as an open, collaboratively edited knowledge base, it’s held great promise for the library and scholarly communication community more broadly. Institutions and individual information professionals turned Wikidatans are using Wikidata to build a community-owned infrastructure for the bibliographic ecosystem, including open source tools that generate profiles of scholars, organizations, and publications. This workshop will introduce participants to Wikidata and its linked data infrastructure, including opportunities for hands-on editing and an overview of tools that facilitate data contribution and use. Participants will leave prepared to connect with existing Wikidata initiatives, and with entry points to launch their own.

Tuesday October 15, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm BST
Lansdowne

9:00am BST

Research software hackathon
Participation in this workshop is free to registered participants of the FORCE2019 meeting, but required. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4. Register for the #FORCE2019 meeting here.
_____________
Software is a cross-cutting concern in research for multiple reasons, including communication, reproducibility, open science/open scholarship and citation/credit. The purpose of this all-day hackathon is to bring together stakeholders who are actively working to improve the status of research software in the scholarly environment. Anyone who is interested in software as a research artifact is encouraged to participate.

During the hackathon, we will discuss a variety of different approaches to make software identifiable, citable, reusable and reproducible, and work towards both a common understanding of the issues and a shared set of guidelines. The hackathon will include a few presentations about research software challenges and institutional solutions, as well as various hands-on activities. Activities will be carried out in parallel tracks or sequentially, depending on the number of participants. The results will be summarised in a wrap-up discussion at the end of the workshop.

The activities used during the hackathon will focus on roughly two to four of the following categories, depending on the interests of participants:

Identifiers for software
  • Granularity of identification
  • Correspondence between different identifier schemas
  • Hacking the software citation graph
  • Exploring synergies

Metadata interoperability
  • Metadata mapping (CodeMeta)
  • Connections with WikiData

Data quality
  • Guidelines and checklists
  • Moderation process
  • Supporting reproducibility

Policies and incentives
  • Institutions
  • Evaluation committees
  • National research bodies
  • Learned societies
  • Publishers

Tuesday October 15, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm BST
Palmerston

9:00am BST

Working with "ROR" data
Participation in this workshop is free to registered participants of the FORCE2019 meeting, but required. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4. Register for the #FORCE2019 meeting here.
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ROR (Research Organization Registry) is a community-led project to develop an open, sustainable, usable, and unique identifier for every research organization in the world. ROR is a collaborative effort by four organizations—California Digital Library, Crossref, DataCite, and Digital Science—in conjunction with a growing group of stakeholders across the scholarly communication landscape, including librarians, data repositories, publishers, funders, metadata experts, and platform providers. The scope of ROR is the affiliation use case—to unambiguously identify which organizations are affiliated with which research outputs. In this way, ROR specifically aims to fill a gap in the scholarly community ecosystem: the lack of open, community-governed infrastructure for research organization identifiers, and associated metadata that can uniquely identify research outputs and connect them to the institutions where research is produced. We believe that institutions and libraries should not have to pay to collect and access information about what and where their researchers are publishing.

The ROR MVR (minimum viable registry) launched in January 2019 and approximately 95,000 organizations around the world now have unique ROR IDs, which are interoperable with other identifiers like GRID, Crossref Funder ID, and Wikidata. What can we do with all of this open data? The ROR project team is looking to the broader community for ideas about integrations, use cases and add-on services, which will help to connect research, researchers, institutions, outputs, funding and data. In this interactive workshop, we will explore the free, open ROR API and OpenRefine reconciler. Attendees will work in small groups to generate ideas and kick off mini projects that focus on using the ROR dataset to get useful information about research outputs and affiliations.

Tuesday October 15, 2019 9:00am - 12:30pm BST
Clarendon

12:30pm BST

Lunch (provided)
This lunch is free to registered workshop participants. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4.

Tuesday October 15, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm BST
Edinburgh Grosvenor Hotel - Townhouse Restaurant 5-21 Grosvenor Street, Edinburgh EH12 5EF

1:30pm BST

Exploring the Metadata 2020 outputs
Participation in this workshop is free to registered participants of the FORCE2019 meeting, but required. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4. Register for the #FORCE2019 meeting here.
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The Metadata 2020 project was established in 2017. Its goal was to facilitate collaboration between various stakeholders in scholarly communications in order to achieve improvements in metadata. The reasoning was that improved metadata would enhance discoverability, encourage new services and create efficiencies, with the ultimate goal of accelerating scholarly research for the benefit of society. As we approach 2020, the many outputs of the project are taking shape.

During this workshop we will share several of the project’s key outputs focusing on important scholarly metadata questions that affect discovery and access to resources. The workshop will include interactive exercises, in which participants will explore how we apply the project's findings in order to create innovation, impact and incentives for better metadata.

The project outputs that will be covered in the workshop include:
  • Metadata principles - what does it mean to have 'richer metadata'?
  • Metadata personas - who are the key players that will follow the principles to ensure the benefits?
  • Metadata literature review - how are academics thinking about metadata and characterizing its effectiveness?
  • Metadata best practices - what practices are in use today?
  • Metadata concepts, terms and schema - where is there overlap and how do existing schema map to each other?

Tuesday October 15, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Clarendon

1:30pm BST

Open scholarship and collective action: introducing the OS Framework
Participation in this workshop is free to registered participants of the FORCE2019 meeting, but required. Please indicate your workshop preferences via this form no later than October 4. Register for the #FORCE2019 meeting here.
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This workshop, organised by Knowledge Exchange (KE - http://www.knowledge-exchange.info/), will explain the KE OS Framework (http://www.knowledge-exchange.info/event/os-framework). This event will highlight the most significant outcomes of four recent KE activities and how they fit into the framework:
  • The Economy of Open Scholarship and the need for Collective Action
  • Insights in the Economy of Open Scholarship
  • The Openness Profile
  • Practices, Drivers and Impediments in the Use of Preprints
Following the introduction, participants will engage in group discussions, during which they will apply the OS Framework structure in order to analyse the specific ambitions and objectives formulated in Plan S and FAIR data efforts. Participants will therefore get to experience the potential of the OS Framework to address real-world challenges in open scholarship. Additionally, discussions during the workshop will increase general understanding of the challenges facing open scholarship and how collective action approaches can help.

The detailed program for this workshop is available here: https://bit.ly/2mU8jTf

Tuesday October 15, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Lansdowne

1:30pm BST

Research software hackathon
(Continued from the morning session)

Software is a cross-cutting concern in research for multiple reasons, including communication, reproducibility, open science/open scholarship and citation/credit. The purpose of this all-day hackathon is to bring together stakeholders who are actively working to improve the status of research software in the scholarly environment. Anyone who is interested in software as a research artifact is encouraged to participate.

During the hackathon, we will discuss a variety of different approaches to make software identifiable, citable, reusable and reproducible, and work towards both a common understanding of the issues and a shared set of guidelines. The hackathon will include a few presentations about research software challenges and institutional solutions, as well as various hands-on activities. Activities will be carried out in parallel tracks or sequentially, depending on the number of participants. The results will be summarised in a wrap-up discussion at the end of the workshop.

The activities used during the hackathon will focus on roughly two to four of the following categories, depending on the interests of participants:

Identifiers for software
  • Granularity of identification
  • Correspondence between different identifier schemas
  • Hacking the software citation graph
  • Exploring synergies
Metadata interoperability
  • Metadata mapping (CodeMeta)
  • Connections with WikiData
Data quality
  • Guidelines and checklists
  • Moderation process
  • Supporting reproducibility
Policies and incentives
  • Institutions
  • Evaluation committees
  • National research bodies
  • Learned societies
  • Publishers

Tuesday October 15, 2019 1:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Palmerston

3:00pm BST

FORCE11 Board Meeting
Tuesday October 15, 2019 3:00pm - 5:00pm BST
Bedford

5:30pm BST

Open Publishing Awards reception
Thank you to Coko (http://coko.foundation) for sponsoring FORCE2019 and hosting this reception.

Join us in the Roseberry Room (behind the Lobby bar) for a casual reception to celebrate recipients of the Open Publishing Awards (https://openpublishingawards.org). The reception is open to all attendees of FORCE2019 and everyone is very welcome. Coko are sponsoring the event with drinks and light refreshments. The reception is happening at the Grosvenor Hotel (https://bit.ly/2kTPRtk) Roseberry Room starting at 5:30pm. 

Tuesday October 15, 2019 5:30pm - 7:30pm BST
Edinburgh Grosvenor Hotel - Roseberry Room
 
Wednesday, October 16
 

8:30am BST

Registration and coffee
Wednesday October 16, 2019 8:30am - 9:30am BST
Break Area

9:30am BST

Welcome
Wednesday October 16, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am BST
Plenary Room

9:45am BST

Keynote: Who or what are universities for? Reflections on the communication and use of scientific knowledge
The quality of scientific research is increasingly being measured by its capacity for impact: a transformation being driven by the imperatives of UK Research and Innovation funding and the Research Excellence Framework. This paper explores the implications of the impact agenda for the ways in which research is produced, communicated and used. It explores the lessons learned from two case studies:
  1. Building an interdisciplinary and co-produced strategy for research, education and engagement at the Edinburgh Futures Institute.
  2. Efforts to influence policy, practice and public opinion using the findings from the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime.
As the paper will demonstrate, these case studies raise major questions about the role and purpose of the 21st-century university, in the context of increasingly complex and contested political environments. The paper concludes with some reflections on what that role should be.

Speakers
avatar for Lesley McAra

Lesley McAra

Director, University of Edinburgh
As inaugural director of the EFI, Lesley aims to harness the revolution in data, digital and artificial intelligence for social benefit. One of the largest-ever investments made by the University, EFI brings together the arts, humanities and social sciences with data science and the... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 9:45am - 10:30am BST
Plenary Room

10:30am BST

How to foster a community-led cultural shift towards open scholarship
The Open Science MOOC (Massively Open Online Community) is a peer-to-peer learning network based around engaging researchers, librarians and others in the academic ecosystem with open research practices. To achieve a transition to open research, this requires a massive cultural change with sustained community engagement around principles and practices of open scholarly communication. The MOOC has a powerful capacity for training at an individual and institutional level, and to meet growing demands across disciplines on all aspects of open research.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Tennant

Jon Tennant

PhD Student, University Library of Southern Denmark
I work informally on aspects of open access and open science more generally. For the former, this involves advocacy projects, such as a recent open letter to the AAAS, the development of the Open Glossary, as well as raising general awareness and engaging with open access issues on... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Thistle Room

10:30am BST

Perpetual access machines: archiving web-published scholarship at scale
In 2018, the Internet Archive undertook a large-scale project to build as complete a collection as possible of scholarly outputs published on the web, as well as to improve the discoverability and accessibility of scholarly works archived as part of these global web harvests. This project involved a number of areas of work: targeted archiving of known OA publications (especially at-risk “long tail” publications); extraction and augmentation of bibliographic metadata and full text; integration and preservation of related identifier, registry, and aggregation services and datastores; partnerships with affiliated initiatives and joint service developments; and creation of new tools and machine learning approaches for identifying archived scholarly work in existing born-digital and web collections. The project also identified and archived associated research outputs such as blogs, datasets, code repositories and other secondary research objects. The beta API and public interface - code-named "fatcat" - can be found at https://fatcat.wiki/.

Project leads will talk about the project’s current status and upcoming work, focusing on content acquisition, indexing, discoverability, the role of machine learning, service provisioning, and their collaborative work with libraries, publishers, and non-profits. Conceptually, the project demonstrates that the scalability and technologies of "archiving the web" can facilitate automated ingest, enrichment, and dissemination strategies for a variety of web-published primary and secondary scholarly record types that have traditionally been collected via more custom and manual workflows. The project strategic goal is to provide open infrastructure for the perpetual discoverability of and access to archived scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Jefferson Bailey

Jefferson Bailey

Director, Web Archiving & Data Services, Internet Archive
Jefferson Bailey is Director of Web Archiving & Data Services at Internet Archive. Jefferson joined Internet Archive in Summer 2014 and manages Internet Archive’s web archiving services including Archive-It, used by over 600 institutions to preserve the web. He also oversees web... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Plenary Room

10:30am BST

Text and data mining big scholarly data
Staff and students affiliated with a university can access and download all the research papers to which the institution subscribes, provided that they are logged in to that institution’s network. While readers can quite easily access research literature to which their university subscribes, it is not possible for text and data miners to do the same using machine access effectively and at scale. The current amendments and exceptions in UK copyright law have created new opportunities for those who conduct research or study in the UK, who are now able to text and data mine (TDM) content as long as they have lawful access to the resource and as long as it is for the purposes of non-commercial research. In this talk, eduTDM is proposed as a solution for how to deliver this content to text and data miners as easily as possible, based on the subscriptions to which they have access.

The proposed eduTDM architecture is inspired by eduroam, the widely popular solution for internet access across universities, which provides users a common platform for accessing the internet from a network of universities. We would like to propose the eduTDM framework as a one-point access platform for text and data miners to access content from multiple different publishers. In the eduTDM model, users can issue a single API call to obtain all documents matching their needs. This talk will describe the technical components of this work, the proposed design and how it compares with existing services, explaining how the model can support researchers in mining content from multiple publishers. We will also seek feedback from the publishers attending this conference on the technical and organisational challenges of this effort.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Pontika

Nancy Pontika

Open Access Aggregation Officer, CORE, The Open University
Open Access, Advocacy, Repositories, Aggregation, Open Science


Wednesday October 16, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Presidents Room

11:00am BST

Coffee break
Wednesday October 16, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am BST
Break Area

11:00am BST

Conference posters
Conference posters will be on display in the break area throughout both days of the conference. While you are welcome to view the posters at any time during the event, poster-creators are more likely to be available to talk about their work during refreshment breaks.

You should vote for your favourite poster using the online survey (https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YFJ2L6W), basing your decision on how interesting the poster is, how clearly its message has been communicated and how visually effective it is. Voting closes at the end of the afternoon break on Thursday 17th October. Whichever poster receives the most votes will earn its creator a prize!

Wednesday October 16, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am BST
Break Area

11:30am BST

Building communities of practice around environmental open data science
Environmental scientists are a diverse community that ranges from climatologists to geneticists, but we are united by an enormous need to work efficiently with data – and by the fact that we seldom have formal computing or data analysis training of any kind. There is great opportunity to borrow from the work of software engineers and use collaborative open tools that facilitate better science in less time. However, a fundamental shift is needed in the environmental science community that prioritizes data science and provides emerging scientific leaders training in open science tools and practices to strengthen and accelerate their work. I will discuss my work to catalyze this shift through two programs I have developed at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at the University of California at Santa Barbara. The first is the Ocean Health Index training program, which teaches international government and academic scientists how to channel the best available scientific information into marine policy using our scientific method and tools. I launched the second in January 2019 as a Mozilla Fellow: Openscapes, a mentorship program that empowers environmental scientists with open data science tools and grows the community of practice.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Stewart Lowndes

Julia Stewart Lowndes

Senior Fellow, Openscapes Director, NCEAS, UC Santa Barbara
Julia Stewart Lowndes, PhD is a marine ecologist, data scientist, and Senior Fellow at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). As founding director of Openscapes (created during her Mozilla Fellowship) she champions kinder, better science in less time and... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm BST
Presidents Room

11:30am BST

COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations
We present COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations (http://opencitations.net/index/coci). COCI is the first open citation index created by OpenCitations, in which we have applied the concept of citations as first-class data entities. It contains more than 445 million DOI-to-DOI citation links derived from the data available in Crossref. These citations are described in RDF by means of the new extended version of the OpenCitations Data Model (OCDM). We introduce the workflow we have developed to create these data, and also show the additional services that facilitate the access to and querying of these data by means of different access points: a SPARQL endpoint, a REST API, bulk downloads, Web interfaces, and direct access to the citations via HTTP content negotiation. Finally, we present statistics regarding the use of COCI citation data and we introduce several projects that have already started to use COCI data for different purposes.

Speakers
IH

Ivan Heibi

University of Bologna
avatar for David Shotton

David Shotton

Director, OpenCitations
David Shotton is (with Silvio Peroni) Director of OpenCitations, a founding member of the Initiative for Open Citations, and developer of the SPAR (Semantic Publishing and Referencing) Ontologies, a suite of OWL-DL ontologies to serve the academic publishing domain. Originally a... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm BST
Plenary Room

11:30am BST

Transparent peer review: a collaborative approach to opening and building the scholarly record
Transparency is hot topic in scholarly communications, with compelling arguments both for and against increased openness and transparency. Within the realm of peer review, it has the potential to build trust in published research and publisher processes, while also allowing researchers to demonstrate the extent to which they contribute to the scholarly record. However, there are concerns that it may jeopardise nascent careers and increase the burden on high-performing reviewers. This talk will explore these points using the case study of a recently piloted integrated, automated transparent review workflow solution across a number of academic journals from several publishers. It will discuss how the project began, the motivations of the involved parties and the results of the pilot to date.

Speakers

Wednesday October 16, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm BST
Thistle Room

12:00pm BST

Building ... then crossing bridges in support of open research
Following a restructure in May 2019, the University of St Andrews scholarly communications team moved out of the University Library and became embedded in Research and Innovation Services. For many years, the University Library Digital Research teams (including open access and research data management) have worked very closely with the University's research office to share knowledge, build relationships and provide support to researchers with a joint approach. At a time when most libraries are building their support for open research, it is unusual for the scholarly communications function to sit in a research office. In this talk, we will explore the opportunities presented by this change, such as the ability to communicate open research messages with a strong 'policy' context and being closer to the levers needed to facilitate the required cultural change in researcher behaviour. We will also discuss the challenges in developing the skills needed to support open research, including copyright and licensing expertise, repository maintenance, metadata creation and APC management alongside, rather than within, the library. We aim to present new perspectives on collaboration across departments and how crossing bridges can help drive the open research agenda.

Speakers
avatar for Jackie Proven

Jackie Proven

University of St Andrews


Wednesday October 16, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm BST
Presidents Room

12:00pm BST

Contributing to the global commons: repositories and Wikimedia
There is huge potential for universities and their libraries to leverage Wikimedia in order to expose research outputs and collections. Wikimedia comprises sixteen projects in total, including Wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons and Wikidata. At the University of Leeds, the Research Data Management Service have successfully run a project that focuses on linking research data with the Wikimedia suite of tools via a series of ‘editathons’, in order to increase the visibility of research data and enable reuse on Wikipedia and elsewhere. The project - "Manage it locally to share it globally: RDM and Wikimedia Commons" - was the winning submission to a competition launched in May 2018 and sponsored by SPARC Europe, Jisc and the University of Cambridge, called the "Data Management Engagement Award", which aimed to address cultural challenges involved in promoting effective research data practices.

The project has served as a springboard to further explore Wikimedia strategically, both at the University of Leeds and across the White Rose Consortium. For example we are collaborating on a new project looking at Wikipedia citations of research from York, Sheffield and Leeds, and the proportion of these that are open access. The long term goal might be to establish a "Wikimedian in Residence" across the consortium. In this talk, we will present the project's outputs - including a toolkit that will enable other institutions to apply the same methodology. In addition we will explore the potential of Wikidata to link up repositories and other data silos in a manner that enables reuse and increases impact.

Speakers
avatar for Nick Sheppard

Nick Sheppard

Open Research Advisor, University of Leeds
I have worked in scholarly communications for 10 years, joining the University of Leeds in December 2016. Previously I was at Leeds Beckett University and have also served as Technical Officer for the UK Council of Research Repositories (UKCoRR)I'm interested in effective dissemination... Read More →



Wednesday October 16, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm BST
Thistle Room

12:00pm BST

Stronger together: a single open dataset to map every facet of global research
Over the past decade, our community has made great progress in opening up diverse data about global research enterprise. It’s time to start merging all this work together, creating a unified, comprehensive, dynamic, and open map of research. In this talk, we’ll discuss our effort to do just this. We’ve normalized and merged real-time data for: citations (Microsoft Academic graph, Crossref, OpenCitations, PubMed); people (ORCID); institutions (GRID, ROR); papers (Crossref); data (DataCite); full-text locations (Unpaywall, DOAJ); named entities (Wikidata, DBpedia); alternative metrics (Paperbuzz); and funders (Crossref). In doing so, we've created a free, fast, open API that lets users answer complicated, multi-step queries at scale. During this talk, we'll discuss the current and future uses for this API, including tools to monitor Open Access, power scholarly search, inform library subscription negotiations, assess grant performance, and more. We’ll also discuss sustainability and community for the tool, and its relationship with traditional, closed data systems like Scopus or Web of Science.

Speakers
JP

Jason Priem

Co-founder, Our Research


Wednesday October 16, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm BST
Plenary Room

12:30pm BST

Lunch (provided)
Wednesday October 16, 2019 12:30pm - 1:30pm BST
Break Area

1:30pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Open Infrastructure
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

A new open data badge: promoting trust and transparency through validation and verification
(Rebecca Pearce)
Studies by the Center for Open Science (CoS) and others have shown that digital badging can be an incentive for authors to participate in open science practices, particularly with respect to data sharing (Kidwell, 2015: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002456; Rowhani-Farid, Allen, and Bennet 2017: https://doi.org/10.1186/s41073-017-0028-9). In general, the Open Data Badges utilized by CoS and others require authors to indicate their own adherence to open data sharing criteria in order to get their badge. Springer Nature are adding additional accountability into the process. We've created our own set of criteria in consultation with CoS and our Research Data Support team, designed to be applicable across disciplines, achievable for authors and easily verifiable by us. Badges are awarded to articles (not people) that are systematically checked for compliance with these criteria. The goal is to ultimately increase trust and transparency in open science by providing validation and verification of openly shared data sets to the benefit of authors and readers alike. This talk will summarize the most recent findings from this pilot and the refinements that are being made as we attempt to answer the following questions:
  • What influence does badging have on data sharing behavior?
  • What are author attitudes and challenges around data sharing, and how can we better support/incentivize data sharing?
  • How much engagement are articles with badges receiving, and how does it differ from articles without badges?
  • Would it be possible to automate badge criteria checks?
  • Would it be possible to expand digital badging, so that it recognizes authors for participating in other open science initiatives, such as protocol sharing and reproducibility checklists?

Annotation for transparent inquiry: using open web annotation for transparent qualitative research
(Sebastian Karcher)
While templates for transparent research are well established for quantitative work, little work exists on the practicalities of transparent qualitative research. My presentation introduces Annotation for Transparent Inquiry (ATI), an approach developed by the Qualitative Data Repository in collaboration with the open source software non-profit Hypothesis (https://web.hypothes.is/) and Cambridge University Press. Using open web annotations, a W3C web standard, authors annotate key passages of their publications with additional analytical information, extended excerpts, and links to underlying sources - qualitative data - stored in a trusted digital repository. ATI demonstrates the possibilities for transparent research beyond quantitative work, as well as the promise of using open standards and open source tools for research transparency.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Pearce

Rebecca Pearce

Springer Nature/BMC
The slides for my talk about Springer Nature's new Open data badge pilot can be found here. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1pulgQScsiIL9Q8FgW9EK0IUhbDMTx-HcFiuHQ7TNFPw/edit?usp=sharing
avatar for Sebastian Karcher

Sebastian Karcher

Associate Director, Qualitative Data Repository
Qualitative data, data sharing, data citations, Zotero.Presentation slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.9989012.v1


Wednesday October 16, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm BST
Plenary Room

1:30pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Promoting Open Research
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Understanding the implications of implementing FAIR data principles in the life sciences
(Ebtisam Alharbi)
This talk proposes a methodological framework to examine the implications of adopting FAIR principles in life sciences data, using access to the European research infrastructures ELIXIR (https://elixir-europe.org/) and the FAIRplus project (https://fairplus-project.eu/) as a vehicle. This framework attempts to establish a bridge between FAIR data principles and their implementation in life sciences research in order to understand the long-term benefits that would follow. The framework will support collaboration between policymakers, science researchers, resource managers, and many other experts.

Open through collaboration: how libraries can promote research
(Katherine Stephan)
This talk will look at some of the ways in which libraries can promote collaboration, both within universities, and between universities and non academic partners such as regional networks, government agencies and local groups. By embracing this "collaborative turn", libraries will be better able to promote open research, public engagement and collective learning. I will draw on a number of practical examples that place a particular focus on low-cost, high-benefit collaboration, and which are amenable to modification and revision. The talk will be useful for anyone who wants to develop a greater appreciation and understanding of how the library can promote research, and how they might collaborate with others.

Speakers
EA

Ebtisam Alharbi

University of Manchester
avatar for Katherine Stephan

Katherine Stephan

Research Support Librarian, Liverpool John Moores University


Wednesday October 16, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm BST
Presidents Room

1:30pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Skills in Scholarly Communication
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Developing scholarly communications support staff: a collaborative approach
(Helen Dobson)
The number of scholarly communications support roles in Higher Education Institutions has increased significantly over recent years and this has happened without a blueprint for developing staff to carry out their responsibilities. Roles vary across the sector and most development happens "on the job". The Scholarly Communication Competencies Coalition (SC3) is a group of representatives from UK universities and professional associations - including ARMA, the British Library, Jisc, RLUK, UKSG, UK-CORR, CORE, CILIP, SCONUL and Vitae - that was formed in 2017 to consider how a collaborative approach could address this issue. SC3 meets quarterly and has delivered a number of interactive workshops at national and international events. Through these activities, the group has been working to coordinate skills-development opportunities provided by member organisations, and to create resources that will be useful for managers in hiring and developing staff, or as career pathway guidance for individuals who already work in this area or
who are interested in doing so. This presentation will outline the work of SC3 so far and will introduce the key outputs to date.

The Jisc RDM toolkit: moving from a national focus to international collaboration
(Andrea Chiarelli)
This talk will describe the Jisc Research Data Management (RDM) toolkit, an open resource targeted at research support staff, IT specialists and researchers from all disciplines and career stages. The toolkit is intended as a signposting tool that the research data community can use to educate itself on the basics of RDM, open science and open research, and also to identify new topics of interest. Content is updated on a quarterly basis to ensure that it is current, and the web design is continually assessed to ensure that it meets user requirements.

The toolkit represents collaboration at a variety of levels. It can help to foster collaboration between the various resources that it links. Additionally, it encourages the community to work together in order to build shared knowledge and expertise, which may have the effect of reducing the need for individual resources and therefore allow staff to spend their time on other things rather than creating RDM training material. Finally, we are managing the toolkit through international collaboration in the form of a working group with twenty experts from the UK, USA, Australia and Iran. In this talk, we will share our experience of working together to develop this community resource and we hope to hear feedback on how we can take this resource to the next level.

Speakers
HD

Helen Dobson

The University of Manchester


Wednesday October 16, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm BST
Thistle Room

2:00pm BST

An institutional perspective to rescue scholarly orphans
Increasingly, scholars across disciplines and throughout the research life cycle are using a wide variety of online portals such as GitHub (https://github.com/), FigShare (https://figshare.com/), Publons (https://publons.com) and SlideShare (https://www.slideshare.net/) to conduct aspects of their research and to communicate research outcomes. However, these portals, whether dedicated to scholarly use or general purpose, exist outside of the traditional scholarly publishing system, and no infrastructure exists to systematically and comprehensively archive the deposited artifacts. Without adequate infrastructure, scholarly artifacts will vanish from the web in much the same way and with similar frequency as regular web resources. In the “Scholarly Orphans” project, we work under the assumption that research institutions are interested in collecting scholarly artifacts created by their researchers. As such, we devised an institutional pipeline to track, capture and archive these artifacts. The tracking part is crucial, as institutions are usually not even aware of the existence of artifacts created by their researchers in online portals. Our newly developed Memento Tracer framework (http://tracer.mementoweb.org/) is responsible for capturing artifacts and creating high-fidelity archival copies. With Memento Tracer, a human curator interacts with a web-based artifact to establish its essential components and to record these interactions as "Traces". To operate at scale, a Trace can be used to guide the automatic capture of artifacts of the same class. In addition, Traces can be shared with a community of practice for collaboration, reuse, and versioning.

In this talk, I will demonstrate the pipeline (https://myresearch.institute/), and share insights gained by developing and operating the infrastructure. I will also share initial statistics regarding artifacts deposited in web portals by a group of volunteer researchers and captured by our pipeline. The goal is to spark a discussion with the audience about the desirability, feasibility and architecture of institutional processes aimed at capturing scholarly orphans.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Plenary Room

2:00pm BST

Resources for recognizing and rewarding contributions to open scholarship
Implementation of Open Science policy should involve a corresponding improvement in the recognition of contributions to open scholarship, which are currently often unnoticed. Knowledge Exchange (http://knowledge-exchange.info) has established the Working Group on Open Scholarship and Research Evaluation in order to address a move towards a greater awareness of open scholarship contributions, proposing the concept of an "Openness Profile". This profile is a way to document contributions to open scholarship and includes procedures for self-publishing these contributions as a digital object with a persistent identifier. It also provides information on the strategic use of contemporary research information infrastructure to promote the published contributions. The link to infrastructure is also intended to ensure that the profile is discoverable and accessible to both humans and machines. We envisage the openness profile as a collection of documented contributions with a DOI, linked to the contributor’s ORCID. By intervening at the level of infrastructure, the openness profile is able to provide resources that will be not only useful to those presently contributing to open scholarship, but also available for (and adaptable to) future institutional needs associated with top-down research policy initiatives.

Speakers
CT

Clifford Tatum

SURF / CWTS, Leiden University
Project manager at SURF in the Netherlands, Identifiers for FAIR Research Information. And researcher at CWTS, Leiden University, focusing on Open Science infrastructure in relation to emerging evaluation practices.



Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Presidents Room

2:00pm BST

What kinds of open have made a difference in scholarly communication infrastructure?
It is practically impossible to build tools that are maximally open in all ways and at all times. Where should we focus our energy as we work towards open scholarly communication infrastructure? This talk will go beyond openness idealism and focus on what kinds of open have made a difference on the ground. For example:
  • Open source - does anyone actually make decisions based on whether a scholarly communications tool is open source, or even use the source code behind these tools when it is made available?
  • Open data APIs - what uses have they made possible that would not be with just a free website user interface?
  • Open licenses - have non-commercial licenses prevented innovation?
  • Non-profit providers - does anyone actually care whether a company is non-profit when deciding whether or not to use its services?
  • Equitable sustainability - have some models for sustainability proven to be more equitable for some users than others?
What does all this mean for what we should be building in the future? Evidence will be drawn from surveys, research studies, anecdotes and usage data. If you have any interesting evidence, please contribute by sending it to team@impactstory.org!

Speakers
avatar for Unpaywall Journals

Unpaywall Journals

Cofounder, Our Research (Unpaywall)
Unpaywall Journals is a data dashboard with journal-level citations, downloads, open access statistics, and more to help you confidently manage your serials collection: https://unpaywall.org/journals... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Thistle Room

2:30pm BST

Code publication and peer review: a discussion of best practices, technological innovations and recognition
Code has become a central methodology for research, and the number of research papers that make use of existing code or develop new code is growing rapidly. Increasing demands on reproducibility and transparency of published papers, as well as recognition of the individual research artifacts that substantiate the results, has heightened the importance of proper documentation, evaluation and accessibility of published code. Nature and other publishers started peer-reviewing custom code over ten years ago for some journals, when that code is central to the main paper. However, wider implementation of this editorial practice has been slow. This talk will discuss best practices for code peer review, drawing on the experience of several stakeholders, as well as giving an overview of recent technological innovations, piloted improvements to platforms and more efficient workflows that help to facilitate peer review and publication of code. We will also discuss how best to incentivize peer review and publication of reproducible and open code, in order to drive uptake of these practices.

Speakers
EP

Erika Pastrana

Editorial Director, Springer Nature---Nature Research
Code peer review and publication



Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Plenary Room

2:30pm BST

Data stewardship on the map: a study of tasks and roles in Dutch research institutes
Recently, a task group of the Dutch National Coordination Point RDM (LCRDM) delivered a report on data stewardship. Within the LCDRM, experts collaborate in task groups on RDM topics that are too large for one institution to solve and which need a coordinated national approach. Taking into account prevailing uncertainty about the interpretation of data stewardship, the objective of this task force was to provide insight into the demands currently made of data stewards by Dutch institutes, and the solutions that have been developed and implemented for them. The report was realized by various means:
  • Studying international literature in this field
  • Analysing a total of twenty-two vacancies
  • Surveying staff from more than 30 research organizations using a questionnaire
  • Conducting follow-up interviews with eight data experts from the professional field, in order to evaluate the survey findings and ask more in-depth questions
This gave a clear picture of how data stewardship was being implemented at Dutch institutes, as well as guidance on what currently works and what more is needed. The report offers a basis for clearer job descriptions of data stewardship roles and will also help institutions to implement data stewardship locally.

Speakers
MI

Melanie Imming

Imming Impact


Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Thistle Room

2:30pm BST

Insights into the economy of open scholarship
Knowledge Exchange (http://knowledge-exchange.info/) has compiled a collection of interviews, which illustrate how pioneering initiatives - both commercial and non-commercial - set up and operate new or alternative business models in the area of open scholarship. The ten interviewees discuss how their initiatives’ business models respond to new challenges in research dissemination and how their initiatives facilitate open scholarship. The interviewees also offer an insight into the relationship with their users and with other players in the field, and they discuss the infrastructural and technical challenges they have faced so far. Finally the interviews discuss intellectual property issues, such as how to build a viable business model based on open content and standards.

Speakers

Wednesday October 16, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Presidents Room

3:00pm BST

Coffee break
Wednesday October 16, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm BST
Break Area

3:00pm BST

Conference posters
Conference posters will be on display in the break area throughout both days of the conference. While you are welcome to view the posters at any time during the event, poster-creators are more likely to be available to talk about their work during refreshment breaks.

You should vote for your favourite poster using the online survey (https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YFJ2L6W), basing your decision on how interesting the poster is, how clearly its message has been communicated and how visually effective it is. Voting closes at the end of the afternoon break on Thursday 17th October. Whichever poster receives the most votes will earn its creator a prize!

Wednesday October 16, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm BST
Break Area

3:30pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Collaboration
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Fostering a culture of collaboration to strengthen data discovery: the Data Catalog Collaboration Project
(Nicole Contaxis)
The Data Catalog Collaboration Project (DCCP - https://www.datacatalogcollaborationproject.org/) is a multi-institutional collaboration, consisting of more than thirty librarians and developers from across nine academic medical centres, working together to improve the discoverability of their institutions’ biomedical research data - regardless of where the data may be stored. The project uses an open source data catalog system, an instance of which has been installed locally at each participating institution. The DCCP aims to:
  • Tackle challenges related to enhancing metadata schemas for biomedical research datasets
  • Engage the research community around data sharing at every stage of the data lifecycle
  • Develop institutional policy to support data management and sharing
  • Align metadata and technical efforts with national and international data discovery initiatives, such as the National Institutes of Health (https://www.nih.gov/) and Google Dataset Search (https://toolbox.google.com/datasetsearch).
The DCCP is working to build a roadmap that would allow for any institution to: (a) easily install and customize the data discovery system to fit their institutional needs; (b) utilize and contribute to a flexible metadata schema informed by the DCCP; (c) harness sustainable strategies developed by DCCP members to engage their local community around data discovery, and; (d) contribute to a growing community that works together to improve the discovery of research data.

Bringing open scholarship and open education to the public through an academic/public library collaboration
(Matthew Murray)
The open access movement has become a part of the status quo in academia, but how important is it to the general public? This talk summarises the results of efforts by the University of Guelph, who began by running a successful workshop at the university on how to access scholarly literature after graduation, and who have now established partnerships with the public library and a local community space in order to run sessions on accessing scholarly literature and the current challenges of information access.

Speakers
NC

Nicole Contaxis

Senior Project Coordinator, NYU Langone Health
avatar for Matthew Murray

Matthew Murray

n/a
Matthew Murray has worked on projects related to research data management, open access publications, and researcher identifiers. He has presented about zines and comics in libraries and is co-host of Book Club for Masochists: A Readers’ Advisory Podcast.



Wednesday October 16, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm BST
Thistle Room

3:30pm BST

Open access and the public good
It is commonplace for supporters of open access to appeal to notions of "the public good" in order to justify renovating the scholarly communication system. What exactly does it mean to be campaigning for open access from the normative stance of the public good, and has anyone asked “the public” what they think? This presentation will detail the results of a PhD dissertation that asked people about their experience with and access to humanities and social science research in Canada. The research results led to the creation of a theory of knowledge flow that emphasizes reflexivity and reciprocity in the communication of knowledge, and the conclusion that open access to research is not only a way to expedite knowledge flow, but also a methodological imperative for social sciences and humanities scholars especially. This fills a gap in the open access literature by addressing the reasons for the slower uptake of open access publishing in the humanities and social sciences. It also provides arguments based on the concept of the double hermeneutic and the obligation these scholars have to improve communication with the object of their inquiry - that is, society.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Whiteley

Andrea Whiteley

University of Calgary


Wednesday October 16, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm BST
Presidents Room

3:30pm BST

Responsible metrics: what’s the state of the art?
The concept of responsible metrics is gaining traction globally through the spread of principles such as DORA and the Leiden Manifesto, and the introduction of responsible metrics mandates courtesy of Plan S. How are institutions responding to this agenda, and how can an institution not only adopt, but effectively implement a responsible metrics policy? What are the consequences if they don’t? This talk will address these questions, drawing on four years of data gathered by the presenter on institutional engagement with responsible metrics. It will conclude by considering the range of stakeholders that need to play a part in delivering ‘responsible metrics’ and how those parties might collaborate to achieve this.

Speakers
EG

Elizabeth Gadd

Loughborough University


Wednesday October 16, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm BST
Plenary Room

4:00pm BST

Data usage, citation, sharing and metrics
The panel for this session consists of:
  • Catriona MacCallum, Hindawi
  • Daniella Lowenberg, California Digital Library
  • Helena Cousijn, DataCite
  • John Chodacki, California Digital Library (moderator)
  • Martin Fenner, DataCite
  • Rachael Lammey, Crossref

The underlying data created (and/or reused and remixed) for research is becoming as crucial as the resulting text-based output - that’s not up for debate. However, what merits discussion is how our various communities can continue to work together to support the sharing, linking and citation of data. Despite all previous efforts and panel discussions, we’re still not there yet.

There are a number of key parts to this, and collaboration is key to making these parts work together so that the research community can realise the benefits that accurate, acknowledged article/data linking:
  • education for researchers on data publishing
  • encouragement and support for researchers who want to publish data
  • changes in policies and workflows for publishers and repositories
  • provision of infrastructure to collect and disseminate this information
  • development of initiatives and tools to measure data usage and data citations

In that vein, this panel session will dig into the what, the why, and the how of data sharing and data citation. The panel will include representatives from the perspectives of publishers, repositories, infrastructure developers and industry, who will provide an update on how things have developed since the FORCE11 Data Citation Principles first came out, and who will discuss the lessons learned from collaborations within the Data Citation Implementation pilot. We’ll discuss where things stand with data sharing and data citation today, what the issues are, whether we are ready to start taking steps towards data metrics and what we need to do to finally start supporting data with the same rigour as we support other scholarly outputs.

Speakers
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

Data Publishing Product Manager, University of California
Product Manager for Dryad at California Digital Library and member of the Make Data Count team working to provide stewardship for open data and develop meaningful metrics for measuring the impact of data in the research world. Many kinds of identifiers are the connectors in this world and Daniella is working with many partners to make those connections happen... Read More →
HC

Helena Cousijn

Director of Community Engagement & Communications, DataCite
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), University of California
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite
avatar for Rachael Lammey

Rachael Lammey

Head of Community Outreach, Crossref


Wednesday October 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm BST
Plenary Room

4:00pm BST

Uncertain independence: the greening of open source publishing
The panel for this session consists of:
  • Catherine Ahearn, content lead at MIT Knowledge Futures Group
  • Andy Byers, lead developer at Janeway
  • Jason Colman, director of Michigan Publishing Services at the University of Michigan
  • Adam Hyde, founder of the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko)

In 2018, the MIT Knowledge Futures Group (KFG), together with the MIT Press and the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing at Simon and Fraser University, commissioned an environmental overview of open source scholarly publishing tools and systems, which was funded by the Mellon Foundation. John Maxwell, director of the "Publishing @ SFU" program, lead this research and presented on his teams’ findings in 2019 at both the Library Publishing Forum and the Society for Scholarly Publishing annual conference. At the time this abstract was written, the report itself has not yet been published, but will be made openly available later in 2019 on PubPub (https://www.pubpub.org/), an open-access publishing platform developed within the Knowledge Futures Group.

The aim of this panel, which will take the form of a round-table discussion, is to explore the findings of this report and how they might best be used in order to improve and evolve the landscape of open scholarly publishing tools. The primary purpose of the discussion is to inform future adoption, development and resourcing of tools.

The session will begin with a brief overview of the report’s main findings and then will shift into a discussion between representatives of the platforms and organizations profiled in the report, including PubPub, the Coko Foundation's PubSweet components, Fulcrum and Janeway. There will be a significant amount of time for questions and open-floor discussion. During the panel, we hope to address questions such as:
  • Where are the primary gaps in the landscape?
  • What communities are not being served by existing tools?
  • Where is there overlap between technologies and/or possibilities for interoperability?
  • Where can we set helpful industry standards?
  • What areas are better left to open experimentation?

Speakers
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Head of Partnerships, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
Heather Staines is Head of Partnerships for the Knowledge Futures Group, building open source infrastructure for publishers and libraries. Her previous roles include positions at Hypothesis, Proquest, SIPX (formerly the Stanford Intellectual Property Exchange), Springer SBM, and Greenwood... Read More →
avatar for Adam Hyde

Adam Hyde

Founder, Coko Foundation
Adam is a publishing pioneer having founded many methods, technologies, and organizations in this space including Book Sprints (https://www.booksprints.net), Coko (https://coko.foundation), Paged.js (https://www.cabbagetreelabs.org), and the Open Publishing Awards (https://www.openpublishingawards.org... Read More →
avatar for Andy Byers

Andy Byers

Senior Tech Developer, Open Library of Humanities
Come and find me if you want to talk about pub tech or consortial funding models!
avatar for Catherine Ahearn

Catherine Ahearn

Content Lead, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
avatar for Jason Colman

Jason Colman

Director of Publishing Services, University of Michigan


Wednesday October 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm BST
Thistle Room

4:00pm BST

Who will influence the success of preprints in biology and to what end?
The panel for this session consists of:
  • Theodora Bloom, executive editor of the BMJ and co-founder of MedRxiv
  • Amye Kenall, editorial director for medicine and life sciences journals at SpringerNature
  • Dario Taraborelli, science program officer at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
  • Humberto Debat, researcher at the National Institute of Agricultural Technology (Argentina)
  • Naomi Penfold (moderator), associate director at ASAPbio

The landscape of preprints in biology and chemistry is changing rapidly: at least eight new preprint servers have launched in the past year alone, established by journals, publishing vendors, scientific societies and research communities. Moreover, several conservative publishers now permit or even promote preprints, while the more progressive publishers and infrastructure providers support preprint adoption with interoperability and awareness. The significant and continued growth in preprinting at bioRxiv (https://www.biorxiv.org/) as well as the initiation of numerous other preprint-related initiatives in recent years may be evidence enough that the principle of preprints has been proven.

However, the conceptual vision for preprints in the life sciences - and current progress toward this vision - may vary depending on who you ask. For example, preprint server operators, journal publishers, preprinters and preprint readers, funders, policymakers and advocates may all have different normative ideals concerning:
  • What material should be preprinted?
  • When should preprints be preprinted, relative to publication?
  • What kind of feedback should be collected on preprints and how authors respond to it?
  • How and by whom should preprints be filtered and curated, creating reputational indicators that feed into research evaluation mechanisms?
  • How should preprints be reused?

Additionally, the future of preprints is uncertain. The rate of growth in preprint submissions is higher than that of publications, yet only 1 in 50 biomedical publications is preprinted today and adoption is highly variable between research communities; for example, a third of recent submissions to bioRxiv are from neuroscientists, bioinformaticians and microbiologists. While one funder (the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative - https://chanzuckerberg.com/) mandates preprints, there is a call for more funders to follow suit (Plan U - http://planu.org/). Meanwhile, the advocacy and adoption conversations we have and hear about at Accelerating Science and Publication in Biology (ASAPbio - https://asapbio.org/) remain dominated by fears relating to research evaluation and misuse: fears of scooping (including the perception of someone else unfairly gaining from your work), journal rejection, and the repercussions of finding errors in one’s own work and sharing erroneous science by others.

At this point, it is important to reflect together critically on:
  • What would successful adoption of preprints in biology look like to you? 
  • What do current preprinting practices (the who, how, where, when and why of posting and interacting with preprints) tell us about progress towards this vision for success, and the drivers and blockers influencing adoption?
  • Who makes the decisions about how preprinting is delivered, technically and socially? 
  • What are some possible unintended consequences of these decisions and is anyone mitigating these?
  • For whom do preprints not automatically work? For whom and by whom are they built, and who is not included?
  • What may threaten the success of preprints in biology?

Through an informal Q&A style conversation with representatives of different stakeholders, we will explore these questions as well as further questions from the audience. The intention of this panel session is to support transparency and meaningful collaboration between stakeholders, in a way that champions the productive adoption of preprinting in the biomedical and life sciences.


Speakers
avatar for Theodora Bloom

Theodora Bloom

Executive Editor, BMJ
AK

Amye Kenall

Springer Nature
avatar for Dario Taraborelli

Dario Taraborelli

Science Officer, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
Dario is a social computing researcher, a technologist, and an open knowledge advocate based in San Francisco. As the Science Program Officer for Open Science at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, his goal is to build programs and technology to support open, reproducible, and accessible... Read More →
avatar for Humberto Debat

Humberto Debat

Instituto de Patología Vegetal, Centro de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria
avatar for Naomi Penfold

Naomi Penfold

Associate Director, ASAPbio
Talk to me about making preprints a success in biology. Tweet me @npscience.ASAPbio is a small non-profit organisation working to improve transparency and innovation in the life sciences by encouraging the adoption of preprints and transparent peer review. Tweet #asapbio @ASAPbio... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 4:00pm - 5:00pm BST
Presidents Room

5:00pm BST

Keynote: The Journal of Open Source Software: when collaborative open source meets peer review
Speakers
avatar for Arfon Smith

Arfon Smith

Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Open Source Software
A lapsed academic with a passion for new models of scientific collaboration, Arfon has used big telescopes to study dust in space, built sequencing pipelines in Cambridge and has engaged millions of people in online citizen science by co-founding the Zooniverse.He’s also been known... Read More →


Wednesday October 16, 2019 5:00pm - 5:45pm BST
Plenary Room

6:00pm BST

Drinks reception
This drinks reception is happening at the Ghillie Dhu (https://bit.ly/2md4k42), a traditional Scottish bar and restaurant in Edinburgh's city centre. The Ghillie Dhu was originally St. Thomas Episcopal Church, and the building has been restored to showcase its heritage.

Wednesday October 16, 2019 6:00pm - 9:00pm BST
Ghillie Dhu
 
Thursday, October 17
 

8:45am BST

Coffee
Thursday October 17, 2019 8:45am - 9:45am BST
Break Area

8:45am BST

Conference posters
Conference posters will be on display in the break area throughout both days of the conference. While you are welcome to view the posters at any time during the event, poster-creators are more likely to be available to talk about their work during refreshment breaks.

You should vote for your favourite poster using the online survey (https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YFJ2L6W), basing your decision on how interesting the poster is, how clearly its message has been communicated and how visually effective it is. Voting closes at the end of the afternoon break on Thursday 17th October. Whichever poster receives the most votes will earn its creator a prize!

Thursday October 17, 2019 8:45am - 9:45am BST
Break Area

9:45am BST

Keynote: Reflections after 20 years of working in open science infrastructure
Speakers
avatar for Rachel Bruce

Rachel Bruce

Head of Open Research, UKRI
At UKRI, Rachel is working in the open science policy area, in particular the current review of open access policy. She is the UK representative on the European Open Science Cloud Governing Board and G7 Open Science Working Group.She is on secondment from her role at Jisc as the... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 9:45am - 10:30am BST
Plenary Room

10:30am BST

Comparing and analyzing the implementation of data citation and software citation
In 2014, a set of data citation principles (https://doi.org/10.25490/a97f-egyk) were published, followed in 2016 by a set of software citation principles (https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj-cs.86). Both were produced by working groups that included researchers, publishers, funders and librarians, and the software citation group loosely followed the same process as the data citation group. Now, both citation communities have moved on from principles to implementation.

As we examine the progress made by both groups, it becomes clear that some elements of data citation and software citation are similar, such as the need to define appropriate metadata, to work with various groups of stakeholders to understand their specific needs, and to provide guidance and incentives that are customized for these stakeholders. It is also clear that some elements are different - this is partly due to the fundamental differences between software and data, but other factors include the differences in how they are developed, maintained and reused.

This talk is a collaboration between members of the two working groups. The talk will cover the current state of both areas, the similarities and differences, and how these similarities and differences can impact the communities involved. The talk will also consider possibilities for future progress, both in these areas and in other types of citation.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois


Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Presidents Room

10:30am BST

Essential open source software for science: lessons learned in designing a program to sustain the computational foundations of modern biomedicine
Open source software is a key ingredient of modern science. Hundreds of software packages, libraries and applications have become essential tools for biomedical research. However, despite their importance, the majority of these tools are undervalued and often lack funding for maintenance, growth, development and community engagement ,  especially after their initial phase.

In 2019, we designed and launched a new grant program to support open source projects that are critical to science. Funding from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative will provide projects with resources to support their tools and the communities behind them, whether fixing bugs, improving documentation, addressing usability, managing the project, or building community. To complement existing efforts, we will be supporting both domain-specific tools, and cross-cutting foundational tools and infrastructure. We will also not require that proposed work be linked to novel research. In designing this program, we sought advice from several experts on scientific software and open source sustainability, in an effort to ensure that this program meets the needs of its community.

This talk will cover the challenges faced and lessons learned during the design and launch of the program. It will also be an opportunity for participants to engage with us and critically analyse possibilities for supporting scientific open source software in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Dario Taraborelli

Dario Taraborelli

Science Officer, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
Dario is a social computing researcher, a technologist, and an open knowledge advocate based in San Francisco. As the Science Program Officer for Open Science at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, his goal is to build programs and technology to support open, reproducible, and accessible... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Plenary Room

10:30am BST

Open research case studies at the University of Oxford
The University of Oxford has a strategic commitment to support open research. Examples of existing open research practice can be found across the institution. The University is keen to understand and learn from existing examples, and to provide models for others considering adoption of open practices. As part of its support for open research and in collaboration with the academics involved, the Bodleian Libraries have documented four contrasting examples of open research in action. These case studies represent research from the four academic divisions of the University. This presentation will describe the open research aspects of the four case studies and the opportunities for the Bodleian Libraries to support the open activities of the researchers involved.

Speakers
SR

Sally Rumsey

Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford


Thursday October 17, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am BST
Thistle Room

11:00am BST

Coffee break
Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am BST
Break Area

11:00am BST

Conference posters
Conference posters will be on display in the break area throughout both days of the conference. While you are welcome to view the posters at any time during the event, poster-creators are more likely to be available to talk about their work during refreshment breaks.

You should vote for your favourite poster using the online survey (https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YFJ2L6W), basing your decision on how interesting the poster is, how clearly its message has been communicated and how visually effective it is. Voting closes at the end of the afternoon break on Thursday 17th October. Whichever poster receives the most votes will earn its creator a prize!

Thursday October 17, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am BST
Break Area

11:30am BST

Meta: countering the scientific information deluge with content feeds
The Meta project at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) is an innovative, intuitive way of empowering scientists to keep up-to-date with the literature. As with many modern online systems, the app centers around feeds; in this case feeds of recommendations for scientific papers, tailored to the recipient's research interests.

This talk will describe the purpose and function of Meta, including how it differs from similar services such as Semantic Scholar and PubMed. The talk will also detail how the tool indexes biomedical literature and supports the creation of feeds through content curation and data analysis.

The presentation focuses on the CZI's approach in providing a tech-centered, entrepreneurial driving force behind scientific communication. It will also discuss how studying the way in which scientists engage with the literature can provide crucial insights for developing informatics.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Wade

Alex Wade

Technical Program Manager, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative


Thursday October 17, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm BST
Thistle Room

11:30am BST

Citations: how open do we want them?
The panel for this session consists of:
  • Dominika Tkaczyk, Crossref
  • Ivan Heibi, Open Citations
  • Shelley Stall, American Geophysical Union
  • Kathleen Shearer, Coalition of Open Access Repositories
  • Richard Jefferson, The LENS (via remote connection)

The panel will be facilitated by:
  • Bianca Kramer, Utrecht University Library
  • Jeroen Bosman, Utrecht University Library

Citations are an important aspect of scholarly infrastructure. Citation databases play an important role in discovery and assessment; however, they currently lack community governance and often have restricted access. Over half of all articles referenced in Crossref now have openly available citations thanks to the I4OC initiative, enabling the citations to be used by anyone for any purpose. For example, OpenCitations have built the open citations index of DOI-to-DOI citations (COCI - https://opencitations.net/index/coci). Yet what about the other half? When publishers themselves cannot be convinced to make citations open, are there other sources that can be used instead? If so, what role do license restrictions play in the availability and reuse of citations from these sources?

This panel session covers two potential ways of sourcing open citation information and the dilemmas posed by their incompatible license requirements:
  • Crowdsourced Open Citations Index (CROCI - https://opencitations.net/index/croci) - begun by OpenCitations in 2019 as a project in which anyone can deposit citation information, as long as they have the legal right to do so. The information is deposited with a Creative Commons CC0 license in order to enable reuse without limitations.
  • Microsoft Academic (MA - https://academic.microsoft.com/home) and The Lens (https://www.lens.org) can provide a source of citations that are not openly available through Crossref. In both cases, the information is available for sharing and reuse under an Open Data Commons ODC BY license.
While citations crowdsourced through CROCI would be fully open for reuse, the approach is limited in scale. Meanwhile, sourcing information from Microsoft Academic or Lens means that more citations can be made publicly available, but also means that the citations cannot be reused without attribution - for example, they cannot be integrated with other open citations in COCI.

This raises interesting questions, which will also be discussed during this session:
  • What does openness mean for citations?
  • What are the potential uses cases for open citations?
  • Which is the best approach when sourcing citations that are currently not openly available?
  • Can citations really be subject to copyright and/or database licensing, when they are simply statements of fact about relationships between publications?

Speakers
IH

Ivan Heibi

University of Bologna
avatar for Shelley Stall

Shelley Stall

Sr. Director, Data Leadership, American Geophysical Union
Shelley Stall is the Senior Director for the American Geophysical Union’s Data Leadership Program. She works with AGU’s members, their organizations, and the broader research community to improve data and digital object practices with the ultimate goal of elevating how research... Read More →
avatar for Bianca Kramer

Bianca Kramer

Utrecht University Library
Making scholarly communication truly open and participatory is not (just) about agreeing on definitions. It's about people and practices, about providing good infrastructure to carry out and disseminate research, and supporting people in the choices they make as they shape their... Read More →
avatar for Jeroen Bosman

Jeroen Bosman

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Utrecht University
Talk to me about what's on your mind ;-) You can ask me anything about Open Science, the 101 Innovations in scholarly communications survey and project, research tools, the Force11 scholarly commons working group and of course photography, cycling and the absurd.


Thursday October 17, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm BST
Plenary Room

11:30am BST

Publishing in the hands of librarians and academics: three perspectives
The panel for this session consists of:
  • Yvonne Desmond, Technological University Dublin
  • Kevin Griffin, Technological University Dublin
  • Promita Chatterji, Digital Commons

Institution-led publishing today can take many forms. As sophisticated technologies become more user-friendly, an increasing number of digital publishing platforms are emerging. Librarians and academics are often the new vanguard in this evolving landscape. During this session, each of the panelists will present their current activities and explain how they are collaborating in order to further the cause of university-led and academic-led publishing.

Yvonne Desmond, a library administrator, will describe how her library is managing an entire open access publishing program that covers a range of disciplines. She will talk about publishing strategy, managing contributors and stakeholders, and communicating successes and milestones. Kevin Griffin, an academic at the same institution, will describe how he publishes his own peer-reviewed journal - managing submissions, handling peer review, assigning content to issues, tracking readership and reporting to stakeholders. He will provide an overview of how he launched the journal and how he has made inroads within his discipline. Promita Chatterji, a technologist, will suggest what traits make for a flexible, secure, usable and scalable publishing platform, as well as how the most successful platforms seamlessly integrate with institutional repositories. The final part of the session will be an extended opportunity for questions and discussion between the panel and the attendees.

Speakers
avatar for Yvonne Desmond

Yvonne Desmond

Sub-Librarian, Technological University Dublin
I work in the area of digital services and research support. I am particularly interested in the area of open scholarship and how that will evolve.
KG

Kevin Griffin

Technological University Dublin
avatar for Promita Chatterji

Promita Chatterji

Product Manager, bepress/Elsevier


Thursday October 17, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm BST
Presidents Room

12:00pm BST

Promoting reproducibility with registered reports
Publication bias is the tendency of authors and journals to prioritize for publication positive, statistically significant findings. It is a practice that undermines the ability of science to self-correct and incentivizes the adoption of questionable research practices. The publication process means that traditional workflows for peer review are also a form of post-mortem; it happens when the research project is complete, meaning that the authors have no option but to repeat the research if the project is identified as having been fundamentally flawed, which can lead to a significant waste of resources.

Registered reports are an innovative article format, introduced in 2013 and now offered in some form by nearly two hundred journals. They shift the emphasis from the results of research to the significance of the research question and the rigour of the methods. Peer review happens in two stages: first, before any data collection or analysis has taken place (Stage 1) and then again after the data have been collected or analysed (Stage 2). Acceptance in principle is offered at Stage 1 for methodologically robust protocols that meet the journal’s criteria for significance, whereas peer review at Stage 2 serves only to ascertain whether the authors adhered to their protocol. By offering acceptance in principle before the results are known, registered reports neutralize publication bias and incentivize robust scientific practices. Peer review at Stage 1 is also a much more collaborative process, in which reviewers play a significant role in shaping robust, reproducible research projects.

In this talk, I will discuss our experience with registered reports in the context of a highly selective journal - Nature Human Behaviour. I will highlight the opportunities and challenges that the format presents, as well as how it can be used to redefine what constitutes a significant scientific advance. I therefore argue that registered reports help us to align publishability with the scientific values of trustworthiness, reproducibility, and open science.

Speakers
SK

Stavroula Kousta

Springer Nature


Thursday October 17, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm BST
Thistle Room

12:30pm BST

Lunch (provided) and pop-up discussions
During this longer lunch break, the first 45 minutes are intended for normal lunchtime activities, but the latter 45 minutes will be available for pop-up discussions on topics put forward by participants.

TOPICS NOW AVAILABLE HERE

***
Pop-up discussions – Got something you want to talk about that isn’t already in the program? Want to get feedback from your fellow FORCE11 community members? Then please make a suggestion for a lunchtime pop-up discussion. We’ve saved a long lunch on Thursday for participants to organise around their own topics.

Thursday October 17, 2019 12:30pm - 2:00pm BST
Break Area

2:00pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Open Infrastructure
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Next steps for CRediT implementation in universities
(Tanita Casci)
The talk presents a mini case study of implementing the CRediT taxonomy (https://www.casrai.org/credit.html), which is a controlled vocabulary to represent the roles that collaborators can have when contributing to research outputs. Examples include supervision, software programming or writing an original draft of a paper. It is one of many tools that help to facilitate open research. Few universities have embedded CRediT so far, but several more are now on the point of adoption. The talk will cover the what and how of the case study, as well as some lessons learned and suggestions for the future.

Checklists for software citation: what you need to know
(Neil Chue Hong)
The FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation working group has been developing practical guidance in the form of checklists, which are aimed at authors, reviewers, developers, editors and publishers. The checklists help these audiences to implement software citation principles in their workflows. This talk will give a quick introduction to these checklists and explain how they can be used to improve the practice of open research by giving credit for software.



Speakers
avatar for Tanita Casci

Tanita Casci

Head of Research Policy, University of Glasgow
I’m interested in finding ways of improving the culture in which we do research


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Plenary Room

2:00pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Promoting Open Research
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Hanging out your open science shingle: launching an open science program by supporting a new graduate cohort
(Samantha Teplitzky)
In 2019, librarians at the University of California, Berkeley, began a pilot program to introduce open science workflows. The Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) Department was chosen as the target department for this work due to prior connections and its relatively small graduate cohorts. The program began with an overhaul of the library's traditional orientation session, replacing content focused on library policies, procedures and resources with a new approach that instead addresses opportunities for open practices within local research workflows. Through collaboration with the department chair, faculty graduate student advisors and the graduate student affairs officer, the library constructed a year-long curriculum on open science practices and reproducibility within the Earth Sciences. This talk will address the challenges of introducing open science practices on a large campus, describing the opportunities and obstacles encountered while working with a small graduate cohort.

Supporting researchers in higher education: champions and collaborators with a common goal
(Catherine S. Parker)
Researchers have a limited amount of time and are focused on their research journey. They don't have time to waste in wondering which department should pay for their article processing charges, or where and how they need to be storing their data. They just want someone who can guide them at their point of need. At the University of Huddersfield, this support is split between the Library, and Research and Enterprise - I was curious to find out how other universities supported these areas. In the autumn term of 2018, I polled social media and two mailing lists (UKCoRR - https://www.ukcorr.org/ - and ARMA - https://arma.ac.uk/), asking higher education staff for information on the departments in their organisations that were responsible for research support administration, compliance checking and open access queries. Few of the respondents’ answers were clear cut or simple, as all institutions seem to have different ways of structuring these support services. However, one of the common themes that appeared was that collaboration and communication between all stakeholders is vital, and in the majority of cases was actually very good. Different departments need to share expertise and champion their various strengths to their researcher communities; ultimately, we all have the same goal of support researchers in the constantly-shifting research landscape, in whatever way we can. This talk is based on information previously shared via Information Today (https://bit.ly/2mY1mB4).


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Presidents Room

2:00pm BST

2 x 15 minute talks - Skills in Scholarly Communication
This half-hour session will include the following two short talks:

Training biomedical researchers to effectively collaborate with data scientists
(Alisa Surkis)
It is not realistic to expect that all biomedical and health sciences researchers will acquire the skills needed to apply data science techniques to their work. However, these researchers are all going to have to function in a research environment where the use of data science techniques is increasingly important. Collaborations between data scientists and researchers with domain expertise afford new opportunities. However, a lack of researcher awareness about data science can result in missed opportunities for collaboration, and differences in perspective and language can result in failed collaborations. Seeing no existing curricula that met the specific need identified, we developed a class to bridge that gap - Data Science for Non-Data Scientists. The class explains the possibilities, techniques, and terminology of data science, as well as conveying its limitations such as issues of interpretation, implementation and bias. This presentation will describe the motivation for developing the class, outline the approach taken and the elements of the class, describe the different settings in which it has been taught within our institution, and detail the outcomes of the class.

A Reproducibility Workshop Series for Biomedical Researchers
(Ariel Deardorff)
The library, graduate division and Open Science Group of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), are collaborating with other experts on "open" to create a for-credit workshop series. The series is targeted at UCSF graduate students and researchers. It is in response to the need for hands-on reproducibility training for biomedical researchers, and aims to translate recommendations for best practice into actionable steps and training. In addition to covering open data, open code, open protocols, and open access, this workshop series will include sessions on designing rigorous experiments, engaging with new forms of peer review and building a reproducible lab. The eight-part series is scheduled for Fall 2019 and has been designed to meet the rigor and reproducibility requirements of the National Institutes of Health (https://www.nih.gov/research-training/rigor-reproducibility). The goal of this project is for subject experts to provide hands-on training that will improve research workflows, stimulate conversations about open science and research reproducibility, and build an open curriculum that can be replicated by other institutions. This talk will describe this innovative workshop series and report on pre-workshop assessments of researchers' knowledge and behaviors regarding reproducibility.

Speakers
AS

Alisa Surkis

NYU Health Sciences Library
avatar for Ariel Deardorff

Ariel Deardorff

Data Services Librarian, University of California, San Francisco


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm BST
Thistle Room

2:30pm BST

Building a global coalition to 'flip' to community-based infrastructure for open access
There is growing recognition that we need to strive for more than just openness as we chart the future for scholarly communications. A model that simply flips from subscriptions to article processing fees is highly problematic, as it will result in significant barriers to participation for authors in less well-resourced institutions, particularly those in developing countries. Additionally, there is little evidence that a transformation to article processing charges will reduce the already over-inflated prices related to publishing, nor will it lead to a more transparent, community-driven system.

While most institutional efforts have been focused on negotiating transformational agreements with publishers, COAR is working on a longer term, more innovative vision, which we are calling the "global knowledge commons". We envisage a the global knowledge commons as a community-governed ecosystem, based on a foundational content layer that is managed by a distributed network of institutions and research organizations, on which are built value-added domain, national and international service layers. In order to achieve this aim, COAR is currently identifying the social, technical and policy building blocks of the knowledge commons. To this end, it has been assembling a global coalition of organizations that share a common vision.

This talk will provide an overview of the model for a global knowledge commons, introduce the major partners that have become involved so far and discuss strategies for how best to make progress at scale.

Speakers

Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Presidents Room

2:30pm BST

Collaborations to support data harmonization and discovery in the BRAIN Initiative
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) BRAIN Initiative (https://braininitiative.nih.gov/) funds the development and application of innovative technologies to aid in understanding the human brain. In 2017, it introduced funding mechanisms to support:
  •  the development of data archives, standards and tools
  • collaborative research teams studying brain circuit functions' underlying behavior
Grants to support the latter required the creation of data science cores, which were tasked with ensuring that the FAIR principles were applied to the data that was collected. NIH created a consortium of the directors of the data science cores for each of the ten grants funded in 2017 and 2018. The purpose of the consortium was to promote collaboration, and the sharing of tools and resources. I am the only librarian among the data science core directors, and I am working - both within my project team and the consortium - to increase the focus on metadata and data discovery.

Work is currently ongoing in two areas. The first area involves collaboration with a member of one of the project teams, who had developed a metadata collection tool to capture detailed experimental metadata. We are working together to generalize the existing data model in order to support experimental metadata from all participating labs, and to customize the web interface in order to facilitate efficient metadata collection for labs collecting different types of data. The second area involves exploring the use of a data catalog to improve the discovery of BRAIN Initiative data.

This talk will discuss these projects as well as my experiences in integrating with the project team and working within the data science consortium.

Speakers
AS

Alisa Surkis

NYU Health Sciences Library


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Thistle Room

2:30pm BST

Libero Publisher: an update and demo of the modular, open-source publishing platform
In this session, we will demonstrate the first iteration of Libero Publisher, one component of Libero - the open-source, end-to-end publishing workflow that is being developed by eLife in collaboration with the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko), Hindawi Limited and Digirati. During the talk, we will also showcase the system's high-level roadmap and explain how other interested parties are welcome to collaborate with us.

Community-driven and open-source, Libero Publisher presents content in a responsive online format that is easy to access on any device. The format is also straightforward to integrate with other services that enhance the reader’s interaction with the content. The software is built with a modular architecture and accessible front-end patterns that can be reused by anyone. The eLife journal website has a user-driven design that is back by user experience research. eLife's original platform is now being developed in partnership with Coko, Hindawi and Digirati, helping to ensure that Libero Publisher is a high-quality, cost-effective and open alternative to other systems.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer McLennan

Jennifer McLennan

Head of External Relations, eLife


Thursday October 17, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm BST
Plenary Room

3:00pm BST

Coffee break
Thursday October 17, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm BST
Break Area

3:00pm BST

Conference posters
Conference posters will be on display in the break area throughout both days of the conference. While you are welcome to view the posters at any time during the event, poster-creators are more likely to be available to talk about their work during refreshment breaks.

You should vote for your favourite poster using the online survey (https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YFJ2L6W), basing your decision on how interesting the poster is, how clearly its message has been communicated and how visually effective it is. Voting closes at the end of the afternoon break on Thursday 17th October. Whichever poster receives the most votes will earn its creator a prize!

Thursday October 17, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm BST
Break Area

3:45pm BST

Keynote: Pathways to Open Access: University of California’s big-tent approach to transforming scholarly communications



Speakers
avatar for Günter Waibel

Günter Waibel

Associate Vice Provost & Executive Director, California Digital Library
As Associate Vice Provost and Executive Director, Waibel manages one of the world’s largest digital research libraries. Before coming to CDL, Waibel had extensive experience in the digital library and broader cultural heritage communities and is well-known for his work in promoting... Read More →


Thursday October 17, 2019 3:45pm - 4:30pm BST
Plenary Room

4:30pm BST

FSCI at year three: reflections and directions
The FORCE11 Scholarly Communication Institute (FSCI - https://www.force11.org/fsci) had its third session in August 2019. FSCI emerged from a belief that it was no longer enough to bring communities together to discuss and advance the cutting edge; we need to transfer knowledge, understanding and purpose among the diverse communities that will implement the future of scholarly communications. The first two years of FSCI ran at University of California, San Diego, and were vital to get the institute up and running. The 2019 edition was run at a new location and with a new collaborative partner, the library of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). As we look ahead to year four, FSCI collaborators are working to clarify and expand the purpose and effectiveness of the institute. This talk will feature Nicky Agate (University of Columbia), Martin Brennan (UCLA), and Osman Aldirdiri (University of Khartoum). We will give an overview of the brief-but-exciting history of FSCI, and discuss some of the issues that have arisen and which are shaping our future direction. Attendees are encouraged to share their own hopes for FSCI and will learn how they can become more active partners in its development.

Speakers
avatar for Osman Aldirdiri

Osman Aldirdiri

Executive Committee Member, SPARC Africa


Thursday October 17, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Presidents Room

4:30pm BST

The FREYA project: collaborating to link people, papers and data to new things
Effective scholarly research depends on the collection and linking of accurate data about varied components and outputs. Persistent identifiers (PIDs) - such as ORCID identifiers, DOIs or accession numbers - offer a solution to the problem of pinpointing and linking specific resources. This makes it possible to foster reproducibility, for example by ensuring that publications contain links to specific reagents and to the data generated. PIDs also mean that we can more easily gather data about the impact of funding or the use of facilities, and can serve the research community in many other ways.

These user stories are at the heart of the FREYA project, a three-year project funded by the European Commission, which is also part of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). In the EOSC, FREYA and other projects are collaborating in order to build on PID infrastructure, assess emerging identifier types, and foster their development and adoption.

In this session, Martin Fenner (DataCite) and I will introduce the concept of the "PID Graph" and some of the emerging PIDs. We will demonstrate how it is possible to connect scholarly entities associated with those new PIDs to other things using the PID Graph, combining practical examples with a discussion about what might be possible with a PID Graph.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Ferguson

Christine Ferguson

Information Scientist, EMBL-EBI
PIDs for the life sciencesOpen ScienceEurope PMC Literature repository Project FREYA
MF

Martin Fenner

Technical Director, DataCite


Thursday October 17, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Thistle Room

4:30pm BST

Using open competitions to drive innovation and collaboration
The Coleridge Initiative (https://coleridgeinitiative.org/) is aiming to make data more usable and available in the social sciences, by connecting research papers to the underlying data and creating infrastructure that provides access to data in computational environments via project Jupyter. This talk will look at one approach taken by the initiative - using a competition (https://coleridgeinitiative.org/richcontextcompetition) in order to encourage teams to help solve one of the core problems, i.e. building machine learning models that identify references to data sets with no standard identifiers.

Data was supplied for the competition by SAGE publishing and Bundesbank, and funding came from the Sloan Foundation. The competition recieved applications with working software code from twenty teams across the world, with team composition ranging from fully undergraduate through to teams of senior researchers. Submissions were shortlisted and the final six teams were brought together in person, to encourage knowledge sharing and collaboration. All of the outputs were made available under open licences. In this talk, we will briefly discuss the wider project and also analyse the ways in which the competition was a success, as well as ways in which we could make improvements if we were to use this approach again in future.

Speakers
IM

Ian Mulvany

SAGE Publishing
Impact for social science researchers.


Thursday October 17, 2019 4:30pm - 5:00pm BST
Plenary Room

5:00pm BST

Creating a richer picture of research support with grant IDs
Research funders are crying out for better ways to share information about the grants they award, and for more reliable connections between grants and outputs that result from those grants. Researchers need easier ways to acknowledge funding and other support for their work. Content platforms and publishers want to enrich their metadata, and aid new ways to discover and convey relationships between research outputs, people, organizations and funding. Analytics and reporting platforms need authoritative data to build graphs and other tools.

A global group of funders has been working with Crossref since 2017 to develop a robust, open, reliable registry of grant IDs and metadata. In this discussion session alongside our partners, we will give an overview of the why and how of the development of this new infrastructural component. The talk will cover the project's initial demand, the process of community consultation, and the early adopter program Crossref is currently running to link funding to outputs in partnership with the Wellcome Trust and Europe PMC. This is a new community service led by funders and provided by Crossref, which will provide systems across the scholarly network with a richer picture of research support.

Speakers
JB

Josh Brown

Crossref


Thursday October 17, 2019 5:00pm - 5:30pm BST
Thistle Room

5:00pm BST

SciOps: accelerating science delivery by following DevOps-inspired principles
Reproducibility is the cornerstone of the scientific method. Yet, in the computational and data-intensive branches of science, a gap exists between current practices and the ideal of having every new scientific discovery be easily reproducible. At the root of this problem are the dysfunctional forms of communication between the distinct stakeholders of science: researchers, their peers, students, librarians and other consumers of research outcomes working in ad-hoc ways. These groups of individuals are organized as independent silos, sharing minimal information between them, all of them with the common task of publishing, obtaining, re-executing and validating experimentation workflows associated with scientific claims contained in scholarly articles and technical reports.

In this talk, we characterize the practical challenges associated to the research lifecycle - creation, dissemination, validation, curation and re-use of scientific explorations - and draw analogies with similar problems experienced by software engineering communities in the early 2000s. DevOps, the state-of-the-art software delivery methodology currently followed by companies and open source communities, appeared in late 2000s to address these issues. In the past two years, we have been applying the DevOps methodology to implement scientific explorations in multiple domains, such as earth science, genomics and computer systems. As a result, we are able to frame the problem of research delivery, i.e. iterating the research lifecycle, as a problem of software delivery. This makes it possible to repurpose the DevOps methodology to address the practical challenges faced by experimenters across the domains of computational and data-intensive science. We use the term SciOps to refer to a new set of principles that emerge. In this talk, we will present a case study that illustrates how to apply these principles when carrying out scientific explorations. In addition, we will introduce and survey existing tools that help practitioners to follow SciOps principles.

Speakers
avatar for Ivo Jimenez

Ivo Jimenez

Research Scientist, UC Santa Cruz
Ivo Jimenez is an Incubator Fellow at the UC Santa Cruz Center for Research on Open Source Software (CROSS), and a member of the Systems Research Lab. He is interested in large-scale distributed data management systems. His PhD dissertation focused on the practical aspects in the... Read More →



Thursday October 17, 2019 5:00pm - 5:30pm BST
Presidents Room

5:30pm BST

Closing Remarks & Announcements
Make sure you stick around for parting words from Force2020 organizers and Force11 board members.  

Thursday October 17, 2019 5:30pm - 5:45pm BST
Plenary Room